Judges, Referees, and Work Permits

Does a rodeo announcer require a work permit and a Labour Market Impact Assessment to give background information on radio contestants during a rodeo?  The answer is.. it depends.

Section 186(m) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (“IRPR“) provides that:

Work Without a Work Permit

186. A foreign national may work in Canada without a work permit

(m) as a judge, referee or similar official at an international amateur sports competition, an international cultural or artistic event or competition or an animal or agricultural competition;

Amateur Sports Competitions and Events

The Citizenship and Immigration Canada (“CIC“) website states that for judges, referees and similar officials involved in an international amateur sports competition, the event should be organized by an international amateur sporting association and should be hosted by a Canadian organization.  The distinction between “organizing” and “hosting” becomes important, and supporting documents needs to reflect this.

The CIC website further states that events may include international or university games, winter or summer Olympics, etc., and that an “amateur” sports competition is generally defined as one in which the participating athletes are not paid to compete or otherwise participate in the event.  The CIC website notes that there are exceptions to this, as of course in recent decades the line between “professional” sporting events and “amateur” sporting events has become blurred.

Cultural or Artistic Competitions and Events

The CIC website states that judges or adjudicators of artistic or cultural events such as music and dance festivals are included in IRPR r. 186(m), as are judges for animal shows and agricultural competitions.

So what about the rodeo announcer? The following is what CIC’s rationale in the approval of an application under this exemption was based on the facts provided to them. I note that this was not my file, but rather a copy of an approval that I obtained through an Access to Information Act request.


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