Withdrawing and Reinstating IRB Proceedings

Sections 5 and 6 of the Immigration Division Rules, SOR/2002-229 state:

Withdrawing a Request by the Minister for an Admissibility Hearing

Abuse of process

5 (1) Withdrawal of a request for an admissibility hearing is an abuse of process if withdrawal would likely have a negative effect on the integrity of the Division. If no substantive evidence has been accepted in the proceedings, withdrawal of a request is not an abuse of process.

Withdrawal if no evidence has been accepted

(2) If no substantive evidence has been accepted in the proceedings, the Minister may withdraw a request by notifying the Division orally at a proceeding or in writing. If the Minister notifies in writing, the Minister must provide a copy of the notice to the other party.

Withdrawal if evidence has been accepted

(3) If substantive evidence has been accepted in the proceedings, the Minister must make a written application to the Division in order to withdraw a request.

Reinstating a Request by the Minister for an Admissibility Hearing

Application for reinstatement of withdrawn request

6 (1) The Minister may make a written application to the Division to reinstate a request for an admissibility hearing that was withdrawn.

Factors

(2) The Division must allow the application if it is established that there was a failure to observe a principle of natural justice or if it is otherwise in the interests of justice to allow the application.

Application

The leading case on ss. 5 and 6 of the Immigration Division Rules is Canada (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration) v. Sheremetov, 2004 FCA 373.  There, the Federal Court of Appeal determined that the Immigration Division should not consider the merits of the government’s case when considering whether to accept a withdrawal of a request for an admissibility hearing where no substantive evidence has been accepted in the proceeding.  It is only upon reinstatement that the Immigration Division may consider whether the government’s conduct amounts to an abuse of process.


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