Can I Enter Canada With a Criminal Conviction?

31st May 2012 Comments Off on Can I Enter Canada With a Criminal Conviction?

Last updated on March 2nd, 2020

Last Updated on March 2, 2020 by Steven Meurrens

As published in the May Canadian Immigrant magazine:

In November 2011, the Auditor General of Canada Michael Ferguson released a report criticizing the Canadian government for having what he essentially described as a completely inadequate screening process for detecting people who pose a security risk to Canadians.

As one might expect, this did not go over too well with a Conservative government that spent much of the autumn session pushing a public safety agenda. It responded to the auditor general’s report by promising to comply with his recommendations, and stating that it had already begun to make significant investments to improve security screening. Previously, people with criminal convictions occasionally entered Canada undetected. Border officials would also often let them into Canada on a short-term basis without requiring much paperwork. Now, both of these scenarios are likely to become less common.

It is, therefore, important that people who have been convicted of a criminal offence determine in advance whether they will likely be prohibited from entering Canada.

 Will you be inadmissible to Canada?

If a conviction exists, then it is necessary to determine whether the conviction’s equivalent offence in Canada would be a summary, hybrid or indictable offence under an act of Parliament. Then, one must determine when the individual’s sentence was completed, and whether the offence is one such that passage of time nullifies the inadmissibility.

 Consequences for common offences

Here are immigration consequences for some of the more common offences that people have. In general, offences involving the operation of a motor vehicle while impaired by alcohol will render persons inadmissible to Canada for a period of 10 years following the completion of the sentence.

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Restructuring the North American Processing Network

Restructuring the North American Processing Network

29th May 2012 Comments Off on Restructuring the North American Processing Network

Last Updated on May 29, 2012 by Steven Meurrens

Restructuring of North American Processing Network

On May 29, 2012, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (“CIC”) restructured its North American Processing Network.  The restructuring included the closure of immigration section of the Canadian consualte in Buffalo, as well as the realigninment of the immigration functions of the Canadian consulates in New York, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Detroit, and Seattle (the “US Consulates”).   Concurrently, CIC has introduced changes that will allow applicants who currently have a Work Permit or a Study Permit to apply for a Temporary Resident Visa (commonly referred to a a “visitor visa”) within Canada.

Closure of the Buffalo Consulate

CIC has announced that it will be closing the visa section of the Buffalo Consulate.

Applications that are currently being processed in Buffalo (including Federal Skilled Worker, Quebec Skilled Worker, Provincial Nominee Program , and Federal Investor applications) are being transferred to the Case Processing Pilot Office – Ottawa (“CPP-O”).

Re-Configuring the U.S. Network

Effectively immediately, the Seattle, Detroit, and Washington D.C. consulates will no longer be processing new Work Permit or Study Permit applications.  Only the Los Angeles and New York consulates will process new Work Permit and Study Permit applications.  Furthermore, applicants residing in the United States will not be able to choose which consulate to submit their application to.  Applicants living in the United States east of the Mississippi River (including in Puerto Rico, Bermuda, and St. Pierre et Miqueldon) must apply to the New York Consulate.  Applicants residing in the United States living west of the Mississippi River must apply to the Los Angeles consulate.


Applicants residing in Canada who need to apply for an initial Work Permit or a Study Permit may apply at either the Los Angeles Consulate or the New York Consulate.

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Class Action Lawsuit Launched Over the Termination of 300,000 Skilled Worker Applications

21st May 2012 Comments Off on Class Action Lawsuit Launched Over the Termination of 300,000 Skilled Worker Applications

Last Updated on May 21, 2012 by Steven Meurrens

Waldman & Associates and Larlee Rosenberg have launched a class action lawsuit against the Government of Canada’s proposed legislation terminated all Federal Skilled Worker Program applications made prior to February 27, 2008 that are still being processed by Citizenship and Immigration Canada.

Numerous media outlets have reported on both the devastating impact the change has had on individuals, as well as the class action lawsuit, including:

Lawyers Challenge Ottawa’s Move to Erase Immigration Backlog

Would be Immigrants Take Ottawa to Court Over Cancelled Applications

Immigration Changes Leave Chinese Woman’s Dreams Dashed

Our press release states:

If you applied to immigrate to Canada through the Federal Skilled Worker Program and have had your application terminated please contact us.

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Canada Closes Tokyo Immigration Services

2nd May 2012 Comments Off on Canada Closes Tokyo Immigration Services

Last Updated on May 2, 2012 by Steven Meurrens

The Canadian embassy in Tokyo will no longer be processing immigration applications.  All applications which would have previously been sent to Tokyo must now be sent to Manila.

Considering the difference in processing times as shown below, I am sure many potential Japanese visa applicants are probably saying  しまった.

Type of Application
Tokyo Processing Time
Manila Processing Time

Study Permits
3
13

Work Permits
1
15

Skilled Workers (2008-10)
17
18

Provincial Nominees
5
11

Investors
27
55

Spousal-Sponsorship
6
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