Section 129 of the Criminal Code, RSC 1985, c C-46 states:

Offences relating to public or peace officer:

 Every one who

(a) resists or wilfully obstructs a public officer or peace officer in the execution of his duty or any person lawfully acting in aid of such an officer,

(b) omits, without reasonable excuse, to assist a public officer or peace officer in the execution of his duty in arresting a person or in preserving the peace, after having reasonable notice that he is required to do so, or

(c) resists or wilfully obstructs any person in the lawful execution of a process against lands or goods or in making a lawful distress or seizure,

is guilty of

(d) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years, or

(e) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

There are several principles pertaining to s. 129 of the Criminal Code that can be helpful to determining equivalency.
Ancillary Powers Doctrine
In the Supreme Court of Canada decision Fleming v. Ontario, 2019 SCC 45, the Supreme Court of Canda held that a police power to arrest someone who is acting lawfully in order to prevent a breach of the peace is not reasonably necessary for the fulfillment of the relevant duties.