The National Occupational Classification System

The National Occupational Classification System

14th Oct 2014 Comments Off on The National Occupational Classification System

Last updated on April 2nd, 2019

Much of Canada’s immigration system is based on Human Resources and Skills Development Canada (“Service Canada’s“) National Occupational Classification (“NOC“) system.  Economic class applicants generally need to understand the NOC system because the success of their applications will depend on them demonstrating that they have qualifying experience or pre-arranged employment in certain NOCs.  Employers submitting Labour Market Impact Assessment applications to the Ministry of Economic and Social Development Canada (“ESDC“) need to know which NOCs their vacant positions fall under because this will determine the respective prevailing wage and recruitment requirements.  Indeed, it is arguable that international graduates should pay attention to the NOC of their first jobs out of post-secondary school because only experience in certain NOCs will count towards immigration.

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Temporary Foreign Workers to Canada by Year and Job

8th Apr 2013 Comments Off on Temporary Foreign Workers to Canada by Year and Job

The debate over temporary foreign workers is back in the news.  I have received a copy of the results of an Access to Information and Privacy Act request which shows the breakdown of admittance of foreign worker by year and occupation.  (I am not publishing this document on my blog, however, if you want a copy feel free to e-mail me.)

The table below shows the breakdown in 2005 (the last year that the Liberal Party of Canada was in government) and 2011 (the most recent year available).  That I have chosen these years of course has limitations in terms of detecting trends (who knows if an occupation had an “on” or “off” year?).  However, the data is nonetheless interesting, and shows an explosion in the number of people in certain occupations.

Occupation

2005

2011

Percentage Change

Legislator and Senior Management

1,205

2130

77%

Administrative Service Managers

610

1005

65%

Managers in Financial and Business Services

200

390

95%

Managers in Communication (Except Broadcasting)

25

40

60%

Managers in Engineering, Architecture, Science and Information Systems

610

1615

165%

Managers in Health, Education, Social and Community Services

55

90

64%

Managers in Public Administration

25

35

40%

Managers in Art, Culture, Recreation, and Sport

95

145

53%

Sales, Marketing, and Advertising Managers

630

810

29%

Managers in Retail Trade

180

405

125%

Managers in Food Service and Accommodation

570

535

-6%

Managers in Other Services

50

55

10%

Managers in Construction and Transportation

390

1000

156%

Facility Operation and Maintenance Managers

95

190

100%

Managers in Primary Production (Except Agriculture)

55

125

127%

Managers in Manufacturing and Utilities

405

415

2%

Auditors,  » Read more about: Temporary Foreign Workers to Canada by Year and Job  »

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Temporary Foreign Workers do not Deflate Average Wages (Updated)

20th Apr 2011 Comments Off on Temporary Foreign Workers do not Deflate Average Wages (Updated)

On April 20, 2011, the Vancouver Sun published an article by David Green titled “Are there too many Foreign Workers?”

The article notes that from 2004 to 2008, the number of Temporary Foreign Workers admitted to Canada increased from 112,543 to 192,281.  (In 2010 the number was 182,322.)

I take issue with numerous aspects of the article, including:

  • It completely ignores the causation between the introduction of the Post-Graduation Work Permit and the increase in the number of Temporary Foreign Workers.  Prior to 2006, foreign students in Canada could not apply for an open work-permit upon graduation.  This is no longer the case, and many of the over 150,000 foreign students in Canada each year apply for and receive these permits.
  • The article does not mention that temporary foreign workers who decide to become permanent residents are likely more able to integrate than those who simply enter on a Family Class or Federal Skilled Worker Program visa.  The reason is simple.  Temporary foreign workers are already established, have already began to integrate into Canadian society, and have developed a network within Canada.

However, the biggest issue that I have with Mr. Green’s article, and the main objective of today’s post, is to address the misconception that Temporary Foreign Workers are hired because employers do not want to pay higher wages to Canadian citizens and permanent residents.

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The Federal Skilled Worker NOC List

29th Jun 2010 Comments Off on The Federal Skilled Worker NOC List

As part of its recent changes to the Federal Skilled Worker Program (“FSWP“), the government has changed which National Occupational Classification (“NOC“) categories are eligible under the program. In short, the FSWP requires that a prospective immigrant either have a job offer or sufficient experience in a designated NOC occupation. These are typically occupations of which there are a shortage of skilled Canadians.

The following table shows the eligible NOC categories before and after the changes. It shows which occupations have been removed, and which have been added.

NOC

Before

Now

0213

Computer and information systems managers

0311

Managers in health care

0631

Restaurant and food service managers

Restaurant and food service managers

0632

Accommodation service managers

0711

Construction managers

1111

Financial auditors

2113

Geologists, geochemists, geophysicists

2143

Mining engineers

2144

Geological engineers

2145

Petroleum engineers

3111

Specialists physicians

Specialist physicians

3112

General practitioners and family physicians

General practitioners and family physicians

3141

Audiologists

3143

Occupational therapists

3142

Physiotherapists

Physiotherapists

3151

Head nurses

3152

Registered nurses

Registered nurses

3215

Medical radiation technologists

Medical radiation technologists

3233

Licensed practical nurses

Licensed practical nurses

4121

University professors

4131

College and other vocational instructors

6241
Executive chefs
Executive chefs

6242

Cooks

Cooks

7213

Contractors and supervisors (pipes)

7215

Contractors and supervisors,

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