Temporary Resident Permits

4th Jul 2019 Comments Off on Temporary Resident Permits

Last updated on January 9th, 2020

On June 28, 2019 Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada substantially changed the guidance that it provides to officers regarding the issuance of Temporary Resident Permits (“TRPs“).  The biggest change was the removal of the statement that TRPs could not be issued for administrative convenience.

People who do not meet the requirements of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act (the “IRPA“), and most commonly people who are criminally inadmissible to Canada and who are not eligible to apply for rehabilitation, require TRPs in order to enter or remain in Canada.

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Which Members of Parliament are Getting the TRPs?

5th Apr 2013 Comments Off on Which Members of Parliament are Getting the TRPs?

The media is reporting today that Citizenship and Immigration Canada (“CIC“) is unsure over whether individuals who received Temporary Resident Permits (“TRPs”) which were issued at the requests of Members of Parliament (“MPs”) ever left Canada.  I have received a copy of the results of an Access to Information and Privacy Act request which shows the breakdown of TRPs issued by MP.  (I am not publishing this document on my blog, however, if you want a copy feel free to e-mail me.)

The table below shows which MPs, presumably through their respective constituency offices,  successfully requested TRPs since around January 2009.  I have included only current sitting MPs.  That I have done so means that any conclusions reached about partisanship in the granting of TRPs would be based on incomplete information.  The reason that I am posting this is that it does show that MP requests for TRPs are frequently granted, and that constituents should not feel shy about approaching their MPs.

The list is:

 

Member of Parliament

Riding

Party

Number

Bob Deschert

Mississauga—Erindale

Conservative

22

Wayne Martson

Hamilton East—Stoney Creek

NDP

12

John Baird

Ottawa West – Nepean

Conservative

10

Jason Kenney

Calgary Southeast

Conservative

8

Nina Grewal

Fleetwood – Port Kells

Conservative

8

Dean Del Mastro

Peterborough

Conservative

7

Devinder Shory

Calgary Northeast

Conservative

7

David Sweet

Ancaster—Dundas—Flamborough—Westdale

Conservative

6

Andrew Scheer

Regina—Qu’Appelle

Conservative

6

Tim Uppal

Edmonton – Sherwood Park

Conservative

6

Rod Broinooge

Winnipeg South

Conservative

5

Paul Calandra

Oak Ridges—Markham

Conservative

5

Maurizio Bevilacqua

Vaughan

Liberal

4

Lois Brown

Newmarket – Aurora

Conservative

4

Patrick Brown

Barrie

Conservative

4

Dennis Coderre

Bourassa

Liberal

4

Don Davies

Vancouver Kingsway

NDP

4

Randy Kamp

Pitt Meadows—Maple Ridge—Mission

Conservative

4

MikeLake

Edmonton – Mill Woods – Beaumont

Conservative

4

Rob Nicholson

Niagara Falls

Conservative

4

David Tilson

Dufferin – Caledon

Conservative

4

Vic Toews

Provencher

Conservative

4

Alice Wong

Richmond

Conservative

4

Alex Atamanenko

British Columbia Southern Interior

NDP

3

Peter Braid

Kitchener – Waterloo

Conservative

3

Scott Brison

Kings – Hants

Liberal

3

Tony Clement

Parry Sound—Muskoka

Conservative

3

Libby Davies

Vancouver East

NDP

3

Ken Dryden

York Centre

Liberal

3

Rick Dystra

St.

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Restructuring of the North American Processing Network (Continued)

Restructuring of the North American Processing Network (Continued)

14th Jun 2012 Comments Off on Restructuring of the North American Processing Network (Continued)

Restructuring of North American Processing Network (Continued)

In a previous post, I wrote about how on May 29, 2012, Citizenship and Immigration Canada (“CIC”) restructured its North American Processing Network.  The restructuring included the closure of immigration section of the Canadian consualte in Buffalo, as well as the realigninment of Work Permit and Study Permit functions of the Canadian consulates in New York, Los Angeles, Washington D.C., Detroit, and Seattle.  For information on those changes, I encourage you to read that post.

On June 11, 2012, CIC released a further Operational Bulletin detailing additional changes to which consulates which process Temporary Resident Permit applications, Rehab applications, and Authorization to Return to Canada applications. .

Re-Configuring the U.S. Network (TRPs, Rehab, and ARC)

Effectively June 18, the Seattle, Detroit, and New York consulates will no longer be processing new TRP, Rehab, and ARC applications.  Only the Los Angeles and Washington DC consulates will process new applications in these categories.  Furthermore, applicants residing in the United States will not be able to choose which consulate to submit their application to.  Applicants living in the United States east of the Mississippi River (including in Puerto Rico, Bermuda, and St. Pierre et Miqueldon) must apply to the Washington DC Consulate.  Applicants residing in the United States living west of the Mississippi River must apply to the Los Angeles consulate.


The following table more clearly shows the breakdown of the new immigration duties of the US Consulates.

New York
Los Angeles
Washington D.C.
Detroit
Seattle

Visitor Visa

Verification of Entry

Returning Resident
Visitor Visa

Verification of Entry

Returning Resident

Visitor Visa

Verification of Entry

Returning Resident
Visitor Visa

Verification of Entry

Returning Resident

Study Permit (U.S.

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Can I Enter Canada With a Criminal Conviction?

31st May 2012 Comments Off on Can I Enter Canada With a Criminal Conviction?

Last updated on March 2nd, 2020

As published in the May Canadian Immigrant magazine:

In November 2011, the Auditor General of Canada Michael Ferguson released a report criticizing the Canadian government for having what he essentially described as a completely inadequate screening process for detecting people who pose a security risk to Canadians.

As one might expect, this did not go over too well with a Conservative government that spent much of the autumn session pushing a public safety agenda. It responded to the auditor general’s report by promising to comply with his recommendations, and stating that it had already begun to make significant investments to improve security screening. Previously, people with criminal convictions occasionally entered Canada undetected. Border officials would also often let them into Canada on a short-term basis without requiring much paperwork. Now, both of these scenarios are likely to become less common.

It is, therefore, important that people who have been convicted of a criminal offence determine in advance whether they will likely be prohibited from entering Canada.

 Will you be inadmissible to Canada?

If a conviction exists, then it is necessary to determine whether the conviction’s equivalent offence in Canada would be a summary, hybrid or indictable offence under an act of Parliament. Then, one must determine when the individual’s sentence was completed, and whether the offence is one such that passage of time nullifies the inadmissibility.

 Consequences for common offences

Here are immigration consequences for some of the more common offences that people have. In general, offences involving the operation of a motor vehicle while impaired by alcohol will render persons inadmissible to Canada for a period of 10 years following the completion of the sentence.

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