Arguably the most important part of any spousal or common-law sponsorship application is establishing that a relationship is not encompassed by s. 4(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations, SOR/2002-227 (“IRPR”), which provides that: 4. (1) For the purposes of these Regulations, a foreign national shall not be considered a spouse, a common-law partner or a conjugal partner of a person if the marriage, common-law partnership or conjugal partnership (a) was entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring any status or privilege under the Act; or (b) is not genuine. […]

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Regulation 4(1) of the Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations (“IRPR“) state that: 4. (1) For the purposes of these Regulations, a foreign national shall not be considered a spouse, a common-law partner or a conjugal partner of a person if the marriage, common-law partnership or conjugal partnership (a) was entered into primarily for the purpose of acquiring any status or privilege under the Act; or (b) is not genuine. There has been developing jurisprudence on the disjunctive nature of IRPR r. 4(1), including a recent Federal Court certified question on whether IRPR 4(1)(a) is ultra vires the Immigration […]

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The Federal Court has released a decision which seems to suggest that immigration officers can analyse whether a marriage is “one-sided” for the purpose of determining whether a marriage is not genuine or whether it was entered into for immigration purposes.  Although Dalumay v. Canada, 2012 FC 1179 is not particularly ground-breaking, it contains some useful paragraphs reminding individuals what immigration officers are analysing when they process sponsorship applications. Regulation 4 of Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Regulations provides that a relationship will be considered bad faith (and a sponsorship application will be rejected) if the relationship […]

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