LMIA Exemption for Francophones

1st Oct 2014 Comments Off on LMIA Exemption for Francophones

Last updated on May 28th, 2019

 

Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (“IRCC“) has a program to facilitate the ability of francophone foreign workers to enter Canada.  The benefit of the program, called Moibilte Francophone, is that no Labour Market Impact Assessment (“LMIA“) is required.  This means that employers of prospective francophone foreign workers do not need to pass a labour market test in order to employ francophone foreign workers.

To qualify for the LMIA exemption, applicants must:

  • apply at a visa office outside Canada;
  • be going to work in an occupation which falls under National Occupation Classification 0, A or B;
  • have French as his/her habitual language; and
  • be destined to a province other than Quebec.

Here are some other key things to note about the program.

 

1. Recruitment through a francophone immigration promotional event coordinated between the federal government and francophone minority communities is no longer required. 

 

Previously, participation in Moibilte Francophone was restricted to prospective foreign workers recruited through government promotional events. This requirement, which the government interpreted incredibly broadly in any event, is no longer the case.

 

Previously, the program worked as follows:

 

2. Habitual French speaking abilities are required, but not for the job. 

 

To approve the work permit application officers must be satisfied that the foreign national’s habitual language of daily use is French.

 

Where the officer is not satisfied the foreign national’s habitual language is French, applicants may need to attend an interview or provide language results demonstrating an advanced intermediate level or above in French. An “advanced/intermediate” level is defined as Canadian Language Benchmark 7.  » Read more about: LMIA Exemption for Francophones  »

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Learn the Language

8th Jun 2012 Comments Off on Learn the Language

The following blog post appeared in the June 2012 edition of Canadian Immigrant Magazine.

It is generally recognized that proficiency in either English or French is essential if newcomers to Canada wish to be economically successful here.  While immigrants who cannot converse in one of Canada’s official languages may find some employers who are willing to hire them, their career mobility is limited relative to those who can.  Indeed, numerous recent studies reveal that an immigrant’s language proficiency is perhaps the most important indicator of economic success.

The Government of Canada has taken note of these studies, and has begun implanting language requirements for numerous immigration programs.

The Canadian Language Benchmark

The Canadian Language Benchmark (CLB) is the national standard used in Canada for measuring the English language proficiency of adult immigrants and prospective immigrants. It covers four skill areas: reading, writing, speaking, and listening.  Individuals are ranked in these areas on a scale of 1-12.

The Canadian government generally recognizes two tests for measuring an applicant’s CLB level; the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) and the Canadian English Language Proficiency Index Program (CELPIP).  While both use different scales than the CLB (the IELTS runs on a scale of 1-9, and the CELPIP runs on a scale of 0 – 6), their test scores correspond to CLB levels.

Current Immigration Programs With Language Testing

The Canadian Experience Class is the main immigration program that currently requires language testing.  For English speaking applicants, the IELTS is the only test that is accepted in this program.  There are numerous combinations of IELTS scores that applicants can obtain to meet the program’s requirements.  While these vary depending on work experience, a good rule of thumb is that individuals with work experience in management occupations or occupations which require a university degree should score 7 or above in each of speaking,

 » Read more about: Learn the Language  »

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